SANGFROID

Thesis Prototype, Case Study
A smart necklace that helps patients on the onset of chronic vertigo attacks. “Sangfroid” vibrates, has a textural pleasing effect and plays a healing sonic experience into your headphones.
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The Problem

Vertigo is the sudden sensation that you're spinning or that the inside of your head is spinning. Other symptoms include dizziness, being pulled in one direction, a loss of

balance or unsteadiness, nausea, and feeling severely disoriented.

The Solution

A vertigo attack leaves you overwhelmed and

disoriented. I made “Sangfroid” to quickly regain your

composure and bring you back to center.

Deliverables

User Interviews; User Testing; User Research & Site Analytics; Persona & Scenario Modeling; Brand Development; Wireframes; Prototypes; Experience Design; Concept Design; Interaction Design; UX Strategy

Role

Product Designer & Researcher

Final Design
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How It Works

sangfroid

/säNGˈfrwä/

 

Composure or coolness shown in danger or under trying circumstances.

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Does It Work?

I gave several friends who experience anxiety the necklace to wear and played the track in my headphones for them. This was successful and comments included:

  • “Calming sound.”

  • “I like to hold this.”

  • “If this vibrated, that would be perfect.”

  • “I want to hear more drum beats.”

  • “This helps me breathe.”

  • “When I get an attack, I want immediate relief.”

What Experts Say

“A steady drumbeat in your ear would help counter the feeling of unsteadiness felt during an attack.”

~ Dr Diana Kirke, MBBS MPhil FRACS

Assistant Professor, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

“When a vertigo attack happens, he or she needs to feel safe and secure. So a product that really puts them in the zone is

needed.”

~ Michael D. Daras, MD

Professor of Neurology at CUMC

“The brain utilizes auditory and visual information about target location and motion in order to maintain accurate and

congruent spatial calibration across modalities.”

~ Gary D. Paige

University of Rochester Medical Center